Mockingbird Times February 2018

EVERYDAY ADVOCACY

Support Racial Identity

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Maven GardnerAngel youth reporter copy

When it comes to being an adolescent in foster care, I think it’s safe to say that a majority of youth feel a bit alienated. Especially when they are not amongst others that share the same experiences as them. I would like to see more conversations about the importance of placing youth of color in homes that share their racial identity. Or when this isn’t possible, ensuring they have access to resources and/or opportunities that have to do with how they identify.

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Finding My Tribe

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Sierra PhillipsSierra chips.adj

“My name is Sierra and I am an addict.” I have probably said this more then anything else in my life. I attended my first meeting in January of 2013. I walked into the room scared — I was 16 and wasn’t sure what I was getting myself into. Everyone around me was hugging one another, saying hi, and being friendly.

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Letter from the Executive Director

Color Youth Advocacy Day 349.Annie

Dear Friends and Allies,

We finally have something big to celebrate for national Foster Care Month! A major shift has occurred in the child welfare system. Without much fanfare, the U.S. Congress passed the Family First Prevention Services Act this last winter. If implemented and funded well, this shift has the potential to be a “game changer” in how we care for our most vulnerable families and children.

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A Day Behind the Scenes


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Bri WinslowBri Advocate of the Year.ADJ

Legislative session is over for this year! We got a lot accomplished and we have so much to be proud about! Many of the bills that Mockingbird advocated for have been signed by Governor Inslee and that is an accomplishment we should all celebrate.

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Make Change, Be Involved

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Jade TillequotsJade Governor Handshake.adj2

To make change you need to be involved. You need to tell your story, be involved, and share the outcome to make change. For me to tell this story, I must tell you a little about myself. I entered foster care at age 4 and exited at age 18. Since I am Native American, I was placed in the tribal welfare system.

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Why I Pay It Forward


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Jade Tillequotsannie jade


It is easy to stay focused on the negative of our experiences, but something I have found useful for myself and those around me is to use my experience to build community. Being 22 years old and living and surviving everything I have endured, I should be bitter. But I’m not. Instead, I work to improve my community on the Yakama Reservation by using my story. I pay it forward in my community, by enhancing the lives of not only youth in care, but all youth in my community. I have multiple jobs that allow me to help break down the walls youth often build up, including working as a Chapter Leader for The Mockingbird Society and as an administrative assistant at Sacred Road Ministries.

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The Gift of Trust

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Emily Pico


Since becoming a Hub Home provider in a Mockingbird Constellation I have gotten used to a little bedtime tradition: As soon as I climb into bed I hear the buzzing of my phone. The text reads, “I know it’s late, but can you talk?” I sneak out of bed, tiptoe downstairs, and make the call. These calls and texts come at all hours, and every time I find a parent or youth on the other end of the phone who is preventing a crisis.

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2018 Archives